The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a caffeine-polyphenolic supplement on (a) metabolic rate and fat oxidation at rest and after a bout of sprint interval exercise (SIE) and (b) SIE performance.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation.

Drinking coffee causes caffeine-induced physiological alterations such as increases in arterial blood pressure, sympathetic nerve activity, cerebral vasoconstriction, etc., and these physiological alterations may be associated with a reduced risk of cerebral vascular disease. However, the effect of coffee drinking on dynamic cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation remains unclear. The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that coffee drinking enhances dynamic cerebral autoregulation.

Scientific information about the effects of caffeine intake on combat sport performance is scarce and controversial.

Although caffeine is one of the most commonly used substances in combat sports, information about its ergogenic effects on these disciplines is very limited.

Caffeine ingestion elicits a variety of physiological effects that may be beneficial to maximal-intensity exercise performance, though its effectiveness and physical mechanism of action enhancing ballistic task performance are unclear.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine ingestion on performance and estimated energy system contribution during simulated taekwondo combat and on post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation.