This study suggests that wrestling is a safe, positive sport for limb-deficient individuals, that it fosters competitive equality between impaired and nonimpaired participants, and that it has a positive impact on health and quality-of-life. The incidence of residual limb complications warrants monitoring.

AIM: To test the construct validity and reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) method by examining the relationship between RPE and physiological parameters (heart rate: HR and blood lactate concentration: [La –] ) and the correlations between sRPE and two HR–based methods for quantifying internal training load (Banister’s method and Edwards’s method) during karate training camp.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

If you don’t regularly test your performance, how can you be sure that your training plan is effective? A good program of performance testing can help you with this, and a whole lot more. For example, exercise testing can help you optimise your overall physical and mental preparation for a fight; it can help you assess how your body is responding to training and evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining; it can help you identify strengths and weaknesses and create training objectives; and it can help to classify your skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

An effective program of testing and monitoring can help fighters and coaches in mixed martial arts (MMA) accomplish a lot. It can help them judge the effectiveness of a training plan and evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining. Various physical and psychological tests can be used to assess any number of performance factors, or to identify a fighter’s strengths and weaknesses, or to classify their skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis

A good understanding of exercise science can help fighters and coaches in mixed martial arts (MMA) effectively use tests to optimize physical and psychological performance. With the right performance monitoring program, fighters and coaches can: better judge the effectiveness of a training plan; assess the body’s response to training; help evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining; identify strengths and weaknesses; create training objective, and classify skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis

 Performance testing is not just for sport scientists and elite athletes; it’s a lot simpler than you think and there are lots of reasons why you should be doing it. Using the tests described in this article series, you will be able to: better judge the effectiveness of your training plan; optimise your overall physical and mental preparation for fight day; assess how your body is responding to training and help evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining; identify strengths and weaknesses and create training objective; and classify your skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

If you want to optimise your preparation and your performance in the cage on fight day, you should consider implementing a regular testing and monitoring program. The purpose of this article series is to show you how to effectively monitor the physical and psychological performance factors most relevant to MMA.

By Dr Jason Gillis

 Performance testing is a critical, but all too often overlooked aspect of training in mixed martial arts (MMA). An effective program of testing and monitoring can help fighters and coaches judge the effectiveness of a training plan and evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining. Various physical and psychological tests can be used to assess any number of performance factors, or to identify a fighter’s strengths and weaknesses, or to classify their skill status and ability level. But it is important to realise that performance tests do have limitations. For example, a test cannot precisely identify a fighters potential, predict their future performance, or guarantee their success in the cage.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

Competing at a high level in mixed martial arts (MMA) is the end result of a successful long-term training plan administered over many years. Successful training plans strike a balance between training and recovery. However, this is particularly difficult in MMA because the sport requires technical proficiency in grappling and striking, not to mention a high degree of strength, power, agility, flexibility, and an/aerobic endurance. With so many performance factors to consider, fighters and coach often dedicate too much time to training at the expense of recover. This can lead to underrecovery and increase a fighter’s potential for overtraining. In a worst-case scenario, this can end a fighter’s career before it starts.

Dr. Jason Gillis.

Overtraining is one of the toughest opponents a fighter will ever face; its onset is insidious and it plays upon your fear of under-preparation. Add this to the long list of performance factors that a successful fighter must training; like strength, power, agility, an/aerobic endurance, not to mention your technical development, and you see why so many fighters burn-out before reaching their full potential.

Gas mask training has been falsely marketed to athletes as a ‘hypoxic training aid’, even though the composition of air filtered through the mask and into the lungs is the same as outside air.

The purpose of this article is to inform fighters and coaches in the mixed martial arts about the nature of instability training, and to provide guidance for those who wish to engage in it.The term ‘instability training’ was chosen over other commonly used terms, like ‘core stability training’, because it emphasises the training goal, which is to create instability in each exercise, not stability. In this article, the term ‘core’ refers to the musculature that supports the trunk (i.e. rib cage and spine), upper extremity (shoulder girdle) and lower extremity (pelvic girdle). All of these muscles work together as an integrated whole to maintain balance, rather than in isolation4 and core stability (or balance) is controlled through complex neuronal communication between peripheral sensors within the core musculature and central brain structures.6

Most would agree that the field of strength and conditioning (S&C) is perhaps more accessible to the layperson than physics, biology or chemistry. This is not to imply the field is any less scientific, but it probably means that the field of S&C must work harder than other disciplines to differentiate itself from pseudoscience. So, a role of science in the field of S&C, and on this website, is to separate the good from the bad. The case of the Power Balance Bracelet is an example of this.

The fundamental principles of science appear to have been adopted in the domain of strength and conditioning (S&C). For example, when you put the following search terms in PubMed and search by decade, (strength OR resistance OR weight) AND (training OR exercise), it becomes apparent that an overwhelming amount of scientific progress has been made in the last 10 years.