This study suggests that wrestling is a safe, positive sport for limb-deficient individuals, that it fosters competitive equality between impaired and nonimpaired participants, and that it has a positive impact on health and quality-of-life. The incidence of residual limb complications warrants monitoring.

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The aim of the present study was to investigate the benefits of intensive, sustained judo and karate martial arts training in young and older athletes and nonathletes of the same age for attenuating age-related dynamic visual acuity (DVA) decline.

AIM: To test the construct validity and reliability of the session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) method by examining the relationship between RPE and physiological parameters (heart rate: HR and blood lactate concentration: [La –] ) and the correlations between sRPE and two HR–based methods for quantifying internal training load (Banister’s method and Edwards’s method) during karate training camp.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

If you don’t regularly test your performance, how can you be sure that your training plan is effective? A good program of performance testing can help you with this, and a whole lot more. For example, exercise testing can help you optimise your overall physical and mental preparation for a fight; it can help you assess how your body is responding to training and evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining; it can help you identify strengths and weaknesses and create training objectives; and it can help to classify your skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis.

An effective program of testing and monitoring can help fighters and coaches in mixed martial arts (MMA) accomplish a lot. It can help them judge the effectiveness of a training plan and evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining. Various physical and psychological tests can be used to assess any number of performance factors, or to identify a fighter’s strengths and weaknesses, or to classify their skill status and ability level.

By Dr Jason Gillis

A good understanding of exercise science can help fighters and coaches in mixed martial arts (MMA) effectively use tests to optimize physical and psychological performance. With the right performance monitoring program, fighters and coaches can: better judge the effectiveness of a training plan; assess the body’s response to training; help evaluate the potential for overtraining or undertraining; identify strengths and weaknesses; create training objective, and classify skill status and ability level.